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Crash course! It may look as though Saturn's moon Mimas is crashing through the rings in this image taken by out Cassini spacecraft, but Mimas is actually 28,000 miles (45,000 kilometers) away from the rings. There is a strong connection between the icy moon and Saturn's rings, though. Gravity links them together and shapes the way they both move. The gravitational pull of Mimas (246 miles or 396 kilometers across) creates waves in Saturn's rings that are visible in some Cassini images. Mimas' gravity also helps create the Cassini Division (not pictured here), which separates the A and B rings. This view looks toward the anti-Saturn hemisphere of Mimas. North on Mimas is up and rotated 15 degrees to the right. The image was taken in green light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Oct. 23, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute #nasa #space #saturn #mimas #moon #nasabeyond #astronomy #science
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A Barred Galaxy! In 1900, astronomer Joseph Lunt made a discovery: Peering through a telescope at Cape Town Observatory, the British-South African scientist spotted this beautiful sight in the southern constellation of Grus (The Crane): a barred spiral galaxy. Over a century later, the galaxy is still of interest to astronomers. For this image, the Hubble Space Telescope used its Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) to produce a beautiful and intricate image of the galaxy. Hubble's ACS can resolve individual stars within other galaxies, making it an invaluable tool to explore how various populations of stars sprang to life, evolved, and died throughout the cosmos. IC 5201 sits over 40 million light-years away from us. As with two thirds of all the spirals we see in the Universe - including the Milky Way - the galaxy has a bar of stars slicing through its center. Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #hst #hubble #nasabeyond #galaxy #astronomy #science
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